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Quote this post and reply to it Post#1 @ 07-05-01 , 03:43 PM


I had seen this discussed a while ago, but I don't think that it was the main topic of a discussion so it's hard to find.

What are the alloys that make the difference between platinum pieces marked 900 and 950? Does anyone still work in the 900 platinum anymore? I want to do custom platinum rings for my engagement and wedding rings, but I don't like the burnished look platinum 950 gets after wearing it for a few months.

Melissa

[Edited by diamondangel on 07-05-01 at 03:46 PM]

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#2 @ 07-05-01 , 04:16 PM


You have all the information you need right in front of you , try a search on 'platinum 900 950' (all words) and I think you'll find what you're looking for. Add 'iridium' and you'll get even more specifics.

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#3 @ 07-05-01 , 06:14 PM


As always, you're the best Iceman!

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???
Quote this post and reply to it Post#4 @ 07-05-01 , 07:55 PM


I was under the impression that both 900 and 950 platinum get that burnished look after a few months of wear. Is that not right?

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#5 @ 07-05-01 , 09:08 PM


There are definitely people who work w/ 900 Plat. The guy I bought my rings from does, and after doing all my research, it would be my first choice in Plat. From what I've heard, 900 is harder than 950 and some jewelers are really picky about using 900 whenever possible.

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#6 @ 07-05-01 , 09:42 PM


It also depends on the alloy. 950 with ruthenium can also produce a more durable finish.
900 with 100 irid is more common for jewelers to work with, not necessarily harder.
Both work well.

Here is another good thread on the subject.

http://www.diamondring.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8327


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Quote this post and reply to it Post#7 @ 07-05-01 , 11:40 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by diamondangel

What are the alloys that make the difference between platinum pieces marked 900 and 950


Hi Melissa,
The alloy is the same, the most common is the Iridium, the 900 has 900/1000 of pure Platinum and the 950 has 950/1000 of pure Platinum.
The only of the two that can be stamped as Platinum or (Pt) is the 950 or higher content, the 900 must be stamped as Platinum-I or (Pt-I)



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PT 900/PT950
Quote this post and reply to it Post#8 @ 07-06-01 , 12:57 AM


Platinum 900/Iridium 100, most common for fabrication (building by hand), traditional alloy, seems to be prefered by stone setters, welds easily.(welding is a controled melt of the metal, soldering is a filler metal of a lower melting temperature, prefered because when done properly it is seamless an strongest)

Platinum 950/Cobalt 50, Currently most common for mass production casting, harder than plat/irid, hard to bend and can not be welded easily, but can hold a polish a little longer than other plat alloys.

Platinum 950/Ruthenium 50, slightly harder than pt900/ir100, machined for wedding bands.

Platinum 950/Iridium 100, re-introduced recently as a stone setting friendly alloy due to the fact that it is more malliable (ability to compress and be formed) the pt900.

Burnishing (in jewelers dialect)is the act of rubbing and smearing a soft metal with a polished harder metal. Sort of like smearing out scratches in a bar of soap with your finger. The burnishing of platinum will work-harden the surface thus reducing the appearance of scratches from wear. Burnishing polishes the piece up.
When this step is skipped (by non-trained jewelers or for cost/time reasons) the piece of jewelry may show fine scratches/dullness earlier.
I believe this is the "burnished" look that was refered to earlier.

As far as stamping, the current (as of 2001) markings for platinum establishe by the FTC (Federal Trade Commision) are:
Platinum, Plat, 950 Pt, 950Plat or Pt on items with a content of 950 parts per thousand platinum or higher.

900Plat, 900Pt or 900Pt/100Ir on items with a content of at least 900 parts per thousand platinum. (Plat/Irid and Platinum/Iridium are also accepted).
The letters and numbers can be reversed ie. Pt900.

850Plat or 850Pt on items with a content of at least 850 parts per thousand platinum. This alloy is occasionally used on chains.

These markings are based on the US stamping act and the FTC. They may not apply to all international imports.

Its a lot of info.
Good luck

P.S. to keep it simple, stay with Pt900/Ir100 if it is a custom piece. If you order off the shelf you'll probably get Pt950/Cobalt50.


[Edited by ArthurMan on 07-06-01 at 12:58 AM]

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#9 @ 07-06-01 , 10:56 AM


No Arthurman, I guess I used the wrong term. I was referring to the dull, all scratched up look platinum 950 gets after a few months of wear. It doesn't keep it's shine.

And I will definately be going with a custom piece...as soon as I can save up the $1,500 - $2,000 it's probably going to cost me! I figure by the month before the wedding (getting married May 4, 2002), I'll have enough to do it.

Thanks for the great input.

Melissa

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