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Old emilyblue

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#1 @ 02-23-02 , 06:02 PM


I'm out!!! Now that I have my first *official* e-ring question, I'm out of the shadows and no longer lurking!

I took my 4-prong 1ct. ring in to have the prongs tightened. The jeweler (a very reputable one in my area) told me that he had placed a drop of epoxy glue under each of the prongs for "added insurance." I can't even see the glue drops without a loupe, so it doesn't detract from my ring aesthetically, but the whole glue thing just seems strange. I had no idea you could use epoxy on jewelry. Has anyone ever heard of this? Should I be freaked out?

Before I sign off, I would like to say that I LOVE this website! I'm addicted to looking at my own engagment and wedding rings, so it's nice to meet others with the same hobby!



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Quote this post and reply to it Post#2 @ 02-23-02 , 06:09 PM


Personally I would have preferred no epoxy. If you want to reset the stone it could be a problem. Maybe an expert can tell us how epoxy bonds to a diamond and how to remove it. A solvent would be better than trying to chip it off. A proper setting shouldn't need this treatment, or is it indeed good insurance?

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#3 @ 02-23-02 , 06:28 PM


One of my opal rings has the stone set with prongs. The opal moves very slightly (it's not in danger of falling out of the setting) and a jeweler recommended putting tiny dots of super glue underneath. Jewelers are often leery of tightening prongs on opals due to the fragility of the stones. I didn't glue my ring: it strikes me as strange and perhaps detrimental and especially in regards to diamonds. Input from our resident experts is eagerly awaited....

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#4 @ 02-23-02 , 07:42 PM


I can tell you how to synthesize epoxies (as I spent 2 yrs undergrad. research on it), but how they interact with the diamond and the metal depends on the epoxy itself. Since in this case, the epoxy is only holding a diamond and a prong, it would not have to withstand as great of a load as a bridge adhesive. I could look into it, if you like (to know the chemistry behind it).

Go Polymers! (and you all thought my obsessions were limited to dogs and jewelry!)

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#5 @ 02-23-02 , 08:08 PM


All that chemistry is just chicken wire to me. I took so much chemistry in college I thought I was a farmist. Most of it was 2-4-5 tri-methoxy beta phenethylamine, which is probably grossly misspelled.

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#6 @ 02-23-02 , 08:18 PM


Hi Emily,
Glad you jumped from the tribune

About your question is not the same to set a new stone than re-tighten it, some times when the metal has aged and specially after cold work (that is to bend the prongs to set the stone), this metal is more spring like and if your setter or jeweler see that your diamond has a thin or very thin girdle he will never do a over pressure to tighten this kind of stones and some times the stone ratles in the closed prongs and a "cushion" made of epoxy or cyanoacrilate can stop the ratling.
This of course is not done to hold the stone it is because the stone can't be tighten enought to prevent ratling or moving inside the prongs.
If this is done with care you can't notice even with a loupe that is has glue.



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Quote this post and reply to it Post#7 @ 02-23-02 , 08:20 PM


I'm pretty sure the jeweler wouldn't have used epoxy on my most prized possession if he thought it would harm my ring (he knows how obsessed I am with it!!) I was just wondering if anyone else had epoxy or superglue applied to their setting because it does seem kind of odd to me. I have never had problems with my setting before; it was only after my ring was sized down that I noticed the stone seemed loose. I know that the jeweler is not crazy about 4 prongs setting anyhow and he was just trying to make it more secure. I ask him to inspect my ring just about everytime I go into browse, so maybe he just thought the epoxy would make me a more confident about the security of my setting. I must say I did drive myself a bit crazy tapping on my ring every night to make sure there's no rattling sound.

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Thank you, Juan
Quote this post and reply to it Post#8 @ 02-23-02 , 08:24 PM


Juan,

Thanks for answering my question! Now the glue thing makes more sense to me.

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Quote this post and reply to it Post#9 @ 02-23-02 , 08:42 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by emily blue
I have never had problems with my setting before; it was only after my ring was sized down that I noticed the stone seemed loose.


Emily,
This was exactly the cause, when you cut a ring for resize you must close the shank to the new diameter and this makes the prongs to open at the top, if he saw that your diamond was at risk he did the correct to add a cushion of epoxy to your prongs instead of overtighten the prongs because he knows that anyway the prongs will spring back again


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