Sign in or Register Home
DiamondRing.comYour Online Jewelry Shopping Network
 Ideal Cut Diamond Studs at James Allen 
Buy Sell Education Forum Directory Blog  
View Recent Products View Posts Ask Us Ask our Network Jewelers for a quote on a diamond/gemstone/jewelry




 
Post Reply New Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#51 @ 09-06-10 , 08:32 PM


Very interesting replies. If you consider valuers globally establish value based on 3 things primarily.
These are, 1 Hardness or ability to resist wear, the harder the more valuable.
2 Rarity or how common it is the rarer the more valuable.
3 Beauty, the more beautiful the more valuable.
If you consider A rare hard beautiful diamond at one end and just for the sake of it a colorless piece of flourite at the other end of the scale and both have a similar size then one can gain a perspective on all views expressed within this forum.
I do not consider Zultanite to satisfy the criteria for being the rarest, nor do I consider painite to be either as it is not classed as a gem it is a mineral and there is no current example of a cut or faceted Painite available in any known collection world-wide. The original thread asked what is the rarest gemstone out there.
I think the rarest Gemstone out there is the one and only Color Change Sapphire that changes from one color to a complete other color not Blue to another shade of Blue with secondary colors. I am talking of Red to Green or colorless to red under different lighting conditions. These are truly the rarest in the world as there are only four known examples and each of the four in question differs in color to the others except for the 2 colorless to red examples and these were probably the same crystal to begin with. They are represented by color-change sapphire as a rare variety and are further represented by their common variety being sapphire which is hard beautiful and rare in it's better examples. Zultanite comes close as it is Aluminium Hydroxide but Sapphire otherwise known as Corundum or Aluminium Oxide is both superior and more rare in these rare color-change examples.

Old TheRockHugger
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 09-28-10
Posts: 14
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
TheRockHugger is on a distinguished road


Re: Thomas...
Quote this post and reply to it Post#52 @ 09-28-10 , 12:12 AM


Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassandra
Do you know exactly where they found these stones? Under what condition? I'm always looking for interesting stones or fossils when I visit beaches. I don't swim, I sit there and study the rocks. I'll have to keep my eyes peeled.

Are there pictures?



[Edited by Cassandra on 02-12-02 at 01:38 PM]



I would loooove to get my hands on a painite! But as far as gemstones that can actually be purchased, prolly jeremejevite, hauynite, and bixbite.

Old ralencoaster
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 10-01-10
Posts: 7
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
ralencoaster is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#53 @ 10-04-10 , 12:19 AM


Sometimes a simple question has a complex answer, among the gems we are most familiar, emerald is the rarest. Rubies are also rare, such as topaz. Diamond is surprisingly common, but has been artificially low . There are plenty of other gems that are rare but people might have not heard about them.

Old beachgirljenny
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 10-06-10
Posts: 8
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
beachgirljenny is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#54 @ 10-06-10 , 06:32 PM


Quote:
Originally Posted by ThomasH.
Gee- I guess this would be a very long stay on the beach... But I think you would make a cute beach-girl Can I join you? If we start now, maybe we'll find one on burmese beaches when we are around 95 years old
Unfortunately, I have not seen any picture of that material. I dont even know if the owners of these crystals are known...

Thomas H.


If you hang out on beaches long enough you sometimes find this stuff called ambegris. It definitely pays for your holiday! If you don't know its basically this resin which forms around irritations in sperm whale stomachs, and eventually the spew it out and little clumps wind up on the beach. My uncle calls it floating credit

Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#55 @ 10-21-10 , 05:20 AM


Only my opinion, surely as an ornamental or organic mabey Sperm Whale puss is acceptable but so far as the rarest gem I do not think you have considered the meaning of gem. Great to know though. Some part of a whale was actually used in expensive perfume until it was artificially replaced I wonder if floating credit is related.

Old TheRockHugger
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 09-28-10
Posts: 14
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
TheRockHugger is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#56 @ 10-21-10 , 04:46 PM


Quote:
Originally Posted by uniquesapphires
Only my opinion, surely as an ornamental or organic mabey Sperm Whale puss is acceptable but so far as the rarest gem I do not think you have considered the meaning of gem. Great to know though. Some part of a whale was actually used in expensive perfume until it was artificially replaced I wonder if floating credit is related.


Rofl @ whale puss! Actually that is what they used in the perfumes.

Old MotekDiamonds
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 10-21-10
Posts: 5
Years:
Last seen wearing: Wedding Band
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
MotekDiamonds is on a distinguished road


Rare
Quote this post and reply to it Post#57 @ 10-21-10 , 04:54 PM


Color
Diamonds
Orange Red or Blue

Old euphoria066
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 10-28-10
Posts: 3
Years:
Last seen wearing: Rhodolite Garnet
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
euphoria066 is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#58 @ 10-29-10 , 01:07 AM


I've only ever seen ONE, teeny weeny, demantoid garnet in real life... I know it's really rare, though probably not the rarest. I've also seen one sapphirine in a gem dealer's "personal collection" and I had never even heard of that stone before, or since for that matter.

Old quuwan
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 08-31-10
Posts: 4
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
quuwan is on a distinguished road


Rep about the rarest gemstone
Quote this post and reply to it Post#59 @ 10-29-10 , 01:55 AM


But I don't think diamond is the rarest. Because the amount of the diamonds are controlled by the Big company to release in the market. So the diamond's price can be fixed, If you used to see the "blood diamond" that Leonardo Dicaprio acted, you will know. For me, I think 5 ct.alexandrite, change green to red, are more difficult to find than diamond same size. And I've never found taaffeite 5 ct.size.

Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#60 @ 11-23-10 , 06:11 PM


I agree quuwan, I have never heard of sapphire color-change reported in professional publications in any other color other than blue to blue with a secondary color eg. blue flourescent to bluish purple in incandescent. I have seen small colorless to red and green to red. The green to red was a cut stone at over 12 carats. It looked exactly like Zultanite but deffinently was Sapphire. I held it tested it and could photograph it if this was wanted. It was a truly magnificent gem, the owner had considered selling it but that was when Beryllium treatment flooded the market and his fear was that it would be seen as a hoax.
At that time I speculated it's worth to be at least 10 times more than an equivalent Alexandrite however Alexandrites are extremely rare over 3.0 carats and virtually non existent over 5 carats and I am talking of top example color-change green to red flawless perfect gems. This Sapphire was over 12 carats from memory and the only one known of among the worlds most educated colectors then back in 2004. So I put to the Forum if Alexandrite goes from 9k to 13.5k from 2.99 cts to 4.99 cts a 12 carat alexandrite would be worth what ever you asked for it and this Sapphire would be worth 10 times that at least as it is Harder Rarer and the only one of it's kind in the world to date.
I have my theory on why other stones like this are not around and I believe they are not looked for and through normal heat treating methods they are lost for ever. When you consider this is the only one I have seen since 2000 I am probably correct in that last assumption.

Old JadeT

    JadeT's Avatar
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 10-14-07
Posts: 16
Years:
Last seen wearing: Wedding Ring
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
JadeT is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#61 @ 11-27-10 , 08:35 AM


Quote:
Originally Posted by ThomasH.
Painite is probably the rarest true gem material (sufficiently hard (and attractive) to be worn as a gemstone).
As far as I know from literature, only three crystals have been found until 1979. If any others were found till today-I don't know. The stuff was found in Mogok (Burma), is dark red, strongly pleochroic, has a hardness of 8, an R.I. of 1.78-1.81 and a hardness of 8.

Man-I'd like to have one of those 3 crystals...

Thomas H.


Thomas from 1950 to 2002 your comment would be a valid one, however, Painite was discovered in the 1950's in Burma and at the time was considered one of the rarest minerals on the planet. Since 2002 new sources of the stone have been found in Myanmar, Ohngaing and two locations in Mogok. The color of the painite stone ranges from pink, to red, to brown and pleochroic (which means it displays different colors from different angles), and the stone was named after the man who discovered them, British gemologist Arthur Charles Davy Pain Prior to 2005 there were less than 20 painite stones in existence (only 2 of them faceted). Today a few hundred stones with enough quality to be faceted have been cut and several thousand crystals and fragments have been mined.

I found several websites that list between 5 & 10 of the rarest "gemstones" in the world. I am a registered GIA specialist and IMHO, some of these could not really be categorized as a gemstone as they are either rare, not suitable hardness wise or just plain unappealing to wear as a piece of jewelry. They would, however, most likely make a good investment if you were to get your hands on one.

In the jewelry sense of the word gemstone Alexandrite would probably be your rarest gemstone, that is if you want a Precious Gemstone. Coming from the Takovaya district of the Ural mountains in 1840. This deposit was mined for over 60 years and produced both emeralds and alexandrites until the turn of the century. Alexander Fersman, a noted Russian gemologist reported, that 2,000 kilos of rough alexandrite in comparison to 20,000 kilos of rough emeralds were mined. This deposit was the only source of alexandrite for many years and the Russian stones set the original standard for this extremely rare and valuable gemstone.
Russian Alexandrite can be found today, by the truckload at about $50.00 for 4 to 5 carats.

The bulk of Precious Gemstone Quality Alexandrite now comes predominantly from Brazil, Africa, India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Tanzania, Madagascar and Zimbabwe.

Hope this clears some things up in regards to Alexandrite. Since it happens to be one of my favorite stones, it is the center of my engagement ring which was handed down from my Mom to me we are Russian, I thought it might be nice to give a small fragment of it's history here.


Gemstone Search:

Budget:  


Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#62 @ 11-27-10 , 05:09 PM


According to this information 10,000,000 carats of Alexandrite were mined from the Ural Mountains alone. I still propose the rarest gem in the world to be a faceted 12 ct. color-change red to green Natural sapphire. It is harded rarer and the only one in the world and can be worn magnificently in cloudy weather as green or sunny weather as red. If an Alexandrite were even available at 12 cts. and show a flawless appearance and have an even moderate color-change then compared to this 12 cts. sapphire the alexandrite would be softer, less rare and less sought after, it has been estimated at least 10 times less.

Old JadeT

    JadeT's Avatar
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 10-14-07
Posts: 16
Years:
Last seen wearing: Wedding Ring
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
JadeT is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#63 @ 11-28-10 , 09:08 AM


Quote:
Originally Posted by uniquesapphires
According to this information 10,000,000 carats of Alexandrite were mined from the Ural Mountains alone. I still propose the rarest gem in the world to be a faceted 12 ct. color-change red to green Natural sapphire. It is harded rarer and the only one in the world and can be worn magnificently in cloudy weather as green or sunny weather as red. If an Alexandrite were even available at 12 cts. and show a flawless appearance and have an even moderate color-change then compared to this 12 cts. sapphire the alexandrite would be softer, less rare and less sought after, it has been estimated at least 10 times less.


On page 1 of this thread "Mednikow" makes the statement in regards to Painite (a mineral and not categorized as a gemstone)"...and painite is an example of a gemstone that is so rare that it can't really be marketed as a gemstone. If there are only three in the world, then no one would ever use one in a piece of jewelry, and no demand could ever be built for the item".

With all due respect uniquesapphires, this would hold true with the 12ct color-change red to green Natural Sapphire. Due to the fact that their is only one of them I would agree with it's "Rarest Status" setting Diamond's aside.

If I read the initial post correctly, they are interested in Rare gemstones that they could actually purchase for their collection. So, they are looking for price per carat. Having said this any educated gemologist knows that there are so many variables to this question that one particular stone cannot fill the bill. One would need to scour the world in search of the Highest priced by Carat, Cut, Quality, Cut & Polish, Size as well as Shape.
This also means that the Size is not the only factor.

I still stand by my Alexandrite statement, although there are quite a few sub-standard Alexandrite's out there. There are also a Few Wonderful Alex's to be had. The one at the center of my engagement ring has an appraised value of over $150,000.00, all factors mentioned above considered. It was mined in the Takovaya district of the Ural mountains in 1871 and has been in my family ever since (albeit having seen more than one setting). When it comes to the hardness difference between an Alexandrite and a Sapphire we are talking the difference between 8.5 & 9 on the Mohs Scale.

When we talk Sapphires we are talking about Natural Sapphires and according to
"World-famous Sapphire
Large sapphires are rare and often attract fame and myth. The largest star sapphire is the Star of India at an amazing 536 carats. Discovered about three hundred years ago in Sri Lanka, the Star of India was donated to the American Museum of Natural History by the financier J.P. Morgan. Later the infamous burglar Jack Murphy, Murph the Surf, stole the stone. Its recovery two months later only added to its fame.

The 423 carat Logan Sapphire is displayed in the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. It is the largest faceted sapphire on public display and perhaps the largest blue sapphire known. This egg-sized, cushion cut stone from Sri Lanka is set in a brooch surrounded by 16 carats of diamonds. It was donated by Mrs. John A. Logan to the Smithsonian Institute in 1960.

Other famous sapphires include the Midnight Star, a 116 carat black star sapphire. The intensely blue 330ct. Star of Asia can be found in American Museum of Natural History. Also, the English Crown Jewels contain two famous sapphires: the St. Edward's and the Stuart Sapphire (104 carats)".

I felt that these examples show that rarity does not always make for desirable adornments but do belong in a place where all can enjoy.


Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#64 @ 11-29-10 , 07:55 AM


I am sorry to say JadeT I think you may have misunderstood a few things the original post is
"Since diamonds aren't rare, I was just wondering which gemstone out there is the rarest? Does anybody know???
For the gemologists out there, which gem is the most expensive per carat, is it the diamond? Or is there a more "expensive" stone out there??

Just trying to educate myself, I like to know these things :-)

THANKS!

The original post is two questions. to answer the first one yes I agree with you the 12 cts color-change sapphire green to red would have to be the rarest one so far and I do believe even if you include diamonds.
Now if you consider the second question most expensive price per carat it is recorded as the diamond and actually the Fancy Bright Blue Diamond at approximately $600,000.00 U.S. per carat. Next is colorless Diamond above 9 carats at approximately $150,000.00 per carat. Now this is for Flawless and perfect in every way according to the Gemmological Institute of America.
So far as a color-change sapphire not being available to meet demand, you can find hundreds if not thousands of them available all over the world now on the net. The 12 cts color-change sapphire green to red is just the most outstanding and desireable of them so it is still the most real contender compared to Alexandrite. I am sorry if this offends you in any way I do believe you have one very desireable gem on your finger.
If again we stick to the facts Moh's scale of hardness is from 1 to 10, talc being 1 and diamond being 10. This does not mean that diamond is only 10 times harder than talc. The scale is a parabolic curve with talc at the begining of the flat line and diamond shooting up and sitting at the very peak of the curve. Granted 8.5 on this scale is much harder than quartz at around 7 this means that every day dust that is mostly quartz won't scratch your beautiful alexandrite however it is scientific fact that corundum or sapphire is much harder than chrysoberyl alexandrite.
So to sum up Chrysoberyl is quite common compared to Corundum (sapphire) and Alexandrite is rarer than color-change sapphire making it less marketable than color-change sapphire as most people would not know what alexandrite or chrysoberyl is where as everyone on the planet knows what a sapphire is and a vast majority know what a color-change sapphire is.
If a person were asked to pick between the rarest color-change sapphire of 12 cts. or an alexandrite not as hard or rare or expensive and at best mabey 5 cts. I know which one I would pick and I don't think Alexander The Great would like my choice. So far as being available for the world to see in the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, if I had a spare 2 million dollars I might be brazen enough to approach the owner then donate it to the Smithsonian. Yes I agree with you JadeT, that would be a wonderful thought.

Old JadeT

    JadeT's Avatar
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 10-14-07
Posts: 16
Years:
Last seen wearing: Wedding Ring
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
JadeT is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#65 @ 11-29-10 , 09:01 AM


Quote:
Originally Posted by uniquesapphires
I am sorry to say JadeT I think you may have misunderstood a few things the original post is
"Since diamonds aren't rare, I was just wondering which gemstone out there is the rarest? Does anybody know???
For the gemologists out there, which gem is the most expensive per carat, is it the diamond? Or is there a more "expensive" stone out there??

Just trying to educate myself, I like to know these things :-)

THANKS!

The original post is two questions. to answer the first one yes I agree with you the 12 cts color-change sapphire green to red would have to be the rarest one so far and I do believe even if you include diamonds.
Now if you consider the second question most expensive price per carat it is recorded as the diamond and actually the Fancy Bright Blue Diamond at approximately $600,000.00 U.S. per carat. Next is colorless Diamond above 9 carats at approximately $150,000.00 per carat. Now this is for Flawless and perfect in every way according to the Gemological Institute of America.
So far as a color-change sapphire not being available to meet demand, you can find hundreds if not thousands of them available all over the world now on the net. The 12 cts color-change sapphire green to red is just the most outstanding and desireable of them so it is still the most real contender compared to Alexandrite. I am sorry if this offends you in any way I do believe you have one very desireable gem on your finger.
If again we stick to the facts Moh's scale of hardness is from 1 to 10, talc being 1 and diamond being 10. This does not mean that diamond is only 10 times harder than talc. The scale is a parabolic curve with talc at the begining of the flat line and diamond shooting up and sitting at the very peak of the curve. Granted 8.5 on this scale is much harder than quartz at around 7 this means that every day dust that is mostly quartz won't scratch your beautiful alexandrite however it is scientific fact that corundum or sapphire is much harder than chrysoberyl alexandrite.
So to sum up Chrysoberyl is quite common compared to Corundum (sapphire) and Alexandrite is rarer than color-change sapphire making it less marketable than color-change sapphire as most people would not know what alexandrite or chrysoberyl is where as everyone on the planet knows what a sapphire is and a vast majority know what a color-change sapphire is.
If a person were asked to pick between the rarest color-change sapphire of 12 cts. or an alexandrite not as hard or rare or expensive and at best mabey 5 cts. I know which one I would pick and I don't think Alexander The Great would like my choice. So far as being available for the world to see in the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, if I had a spare 2 million dollars I might be brazen enough to approach the owner then donate it to the Smithsonian. Yes I agree with you JadeT, that would be a wonderful thought.


As a gemologist, specializing in colored gemstones & not Diamonds I can agree that as far as "mainstream" gemstones your 12ct color-change Sapphire would most likely be the rarest that could be acquired and due to the fact that there is only one of them most likely the most expensive.
I stand by my statements on Alexandrite, whether well known or not.
I would like to correct on just one point and that is that the Alexandrite was named after Czar Alexander II, Alexander the Liberator, not Alexander the Great *that was Czar Alexander I.
I guess I am a completest when it comes to historical facts and the finding of the Alexandrite came during Alexander II reign as Czar.
Thanks for our nice banter hopefully we have helped the original poster with some new information.
Who knows I might even have an Alexandrite convert. That being said, be careful where and from whom you buy them as the desirable ones are expensive and rather large in carat weight.
Enjoy the Holiday's I will be gone for several months visiting my homeland.



Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#66 @ 12-01-10 , 04:23 PM


I too am a gemmologist and certified valuer of all gems amongst other things. I don't understand your reference to mainstream. A gem is a gem a diamond is also a gem, you can look it up there is nothing scary about it.
Your stand is, it would seem based upon personal bias not fact. I can appreciate your view point but you must accept fact. Alexandrite is a great contender but that was some replies ago. So far as the rarest gem and the most expensive per carat even the newly added Pariaba Tourmaline leaves Alexandrite behind just to name one, as a Gemmologist specialising in colored gems that are "mainstream" you surely would know about this one. How about Natural unenhanced ruby at $75,000.00 U.S. per carat, they are so rare on the world market at the moment in anything over 2 carats that it is the reason lesser ruby enhancement has progressed, to cash in on the rise. This is a current dilema globally in the Ruby market.
Yes Alexandrite is a wonderful gem but you should by now realise your argument is futile to even try and rival a Ruby, Tourmaline or sapphire. By the way incase you didn't know the mainstream name for sapphire/ruby is Corundum. I refered to this in my previous post to link Ruby in to my comparison. All this aside your opinion is your opinion, however as a trained gemmologist I doubt you should boast your credentials.
Oh by the way you are correct historically about which Alexander is which but once again I did bait you for the purpose of adding interest to this forum, you see, I doubt very much that Alexander the liberator would have cared at all. Alexandrite was named after him not because of him. However Alexander the great may have had off with my head as his reputation is a more agressive one,
Please don't despair I am only interested in a chalenge but it would seem everyone wants to put their own agenda forward without research. On the other hand at least no one has tried to sell a gem or poach a customer in this forum.

Old Jewelove
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 12-15-08
Posts: 9
Years:
Last seen wearing: Estate Jewelry
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
Jewelove is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem? Most expensive?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#67 @ 02-15-11 , 06:20 AM


Quote:
Originally Posted by GIA
Since diamonds aren't rare, I was just wondering which gemstone out there is the rarest? Does anybody know???

For the gemologists out there, which gem is the most expensive per carat, is it the diamond? Or is there a more "expensive" stone out there??

Just trying to educate myself, I like to know these things :-)

THANKS!

[Edited by GIA on 02-12-02 at 12:47 PM]


Ruby is upto 300 times rarer than white diamonds. & good quality & size unheated Ruby can fetch a good price too!

Old Jewelove
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 12-15-08
Posts: 9
Years:
Last seen wearing: Estate Jewelry
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
Jewelove is on a distinguished road


Good Unheated Ruby
Quote this post and reply to it Post#68 @ 02-15-11 , 06:35 AM


Yes, as a matter of fact, good quality unheated Ruby 5cts.+ can & has earlier fetched prices/ct. higher than diamonds 3 times the size!

The only thing is that diamonds of even over 10cts. can be found, but the same is not true for Natural Unheated Rubies. so, the overall price of the diamond may be higher because of the size. But per ct., normally Rubies are much more expensive.

Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#69 @ 02-16-11 , 04:01 AM


I do agree. Can you reference the 300 times rarer or is this an estimate on your part. You are correct in my view of the rarity and also the value. There are many examples currently to back your claims. There are many gems that are extremely rare and valuable. Value is ultimately decided by the purchaser as they do set the price. If something is to expensive it will not sell. As Ruby is from the Corundum family and we have not seperated one color Diamond from another can we assume (dangerously so might I add) that the current decision is between Corundum and Diamond?

Old Jewelove
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 12-15-08
Posts: 9
Years:
Last seen wearing: Estate Jewelry
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
Jewelove is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#70 @ 02-16-11 , 06:36 AM


Quote:
Originally Posted by uniquesapphires
I do agree. As Ruby is from the Corundum family and we have not seperated one color Diamond from another can we assume (dangerously so might I add) that the current decision is between Corundum and Diamond?


I would disagree. Because Sapphires of 5cts.-15cts. are not so difficult to find. I can give you some beautiful unheated Blue Sapphires in that size range. But ask me for faceted Rubies of fine quality in those sizes, no unheated goods available below 100K.

I think Ruby is the rarest gemstone. Only, red diamonds can match the rarity of Rubies, but as the thread pointed out excluding Red diamonds.

P.S. : Even Blue diamonds & Pink diamonds are abundant when compared to Ruby!

Old uniquesapphires
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 07-11-10
Posts: 33
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 47
Points: 1010
uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of uniquesapphires has much to be proud of


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#71 @ 03-25-11 , 05:46 PM


Here is the context of the original post by GIA.
Since diamonds aren't rare, I was just wondering which gemstone out there is the rarest? Does anybody know???

For the gemologists out there, which gem is the most expensive per carat, is it the diamond? Or is there a more "expensive" stone out there??
It is a double edged question
1 What is the rarest gem?
2 What is the most expensive gem per Carat?
Ruby cannot be the most expensive as their top value recorded at any auction or private sale historically has never exceeded that of Diamond if you have proof contrary to this please share it, I and the GIA would love to know of such a rare occasion if it exists. For your information current records show Corundum ruby Unenhanced as $93,750.00 per Carat wholesale for a 4.00 to 4.99 carat gem of Extra fine Upper end Characteristics. A Fancy Pink Diamond up to 5.00 Carats is at $375,000.00 per Carat and Fancy Blue Diamond is at $600,000.00 per Carat please note that all prices are in U.S. Dollars and all prices have been sourced from The Gem Guide March /April 2011 Volume 30-Issue 2. Mabey you should subscribe to gain access to the most reliable and up to date source.
You have previously claimed that Ruby is 300 times rarer than diamond I doubt that you can provide sourced fact to back this claim as I have spent the last the last month researching your claims and cannot find any example or known record of a top Ruby even a famous one recording sales or comparitive to date figures even historic ones that match that of a $600,000.00 per carat wholesale price tag. Please bear in mind that for such a Blue Diamond the sale price anywhere on the planet would be for a 5.00 carat top Fancy Blue no less than $6000,000.00. if you consider the value of famous Blue Diamond such as the Hope Diamond in the Smithsonian then I think you really are confused or at the very least missled.
Can you back any of your claims with proven fact or are you simply telling Porkie Pies.
Now seriously folks the rarest Gem would have to be a one of a kind from a category and family of gems commonly used in jewellery for rarity and hardness such as Corundum Sapphire Color-Change Green to red, that is to qualify for this answer to this original question anyway. So far as most expensive per carat it is proven to be the Blue Diamond by way of proven recorded and historical sales. That is unless some super rich person buys the Color-Change sapphire for enough to make it the most expensive gem per carat sold.
GIA we have never seen any post by you other than the original, do you have anything to add or offer? Surely you must!!

Old zoultier
 
My Profile
Registered User : offline
Joined: 08-14-10
Posts: 4
Years:
 
My Karma
Power: 0
Points: 10
zoultier is on a distinguished road


Re: Rarest Gem?
Quote this post and reply to it Post#72 @ 10-22-11 , 05:00 AM


You can check 2 link below. I don't make you trust they are real but I know these stones is not easy to find really.
http://listverse.com/2007/12/02/top-10-rarest-gems/
http://www.curiousnotions.com/gemstones/
Sincerely,
Q
Zoultier

Read Messages in: GEMSTONES All forums
Newer:
Up a Topic Alexandrite available by maven
Up a Topic What is jenakite posted in Greet New Members by zoultier
Older:
Down a Topic How do I buy gemstones on ebay by Amy419
Down a Topic How do I buy gemstones on ebay posted in GEMSTONES by Amy419
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:
 
Advanced Search

Contact Us - Guidelines - Privacy Policy - Refer a Friend - Top^


Google Custom Search

XHTML | CSS
Logged in as Unregistered
Powered by: vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 1998 - Present, DiamondRing.com. oHraDaco.
All times are GMT -4. The current time is 12:47 AM.
Validation #035ec4c0.